LA TRAVIATA: A DESIGN "OPUS"

La Traviata is a complete work of art: it is architecture, light, poetry, dance and movement. It is an imaginary scene that allows the observer to contemplate; the light evokes a calm that enhances the senses, making it easier to hear and perceive one’s surroundings. Wilson designed the product on stage with the same approach he uses in all of his expressive vehicles: the work is the fruit of “the reduction of the languages of words, gestures and behaviors to their basic grammars, to the minimal structure of their complexity”. The result is completely abstract and non-interpretive, leaving the on-looker the chance to freely associate their own, imaginative universe. Light is space, and without it, nothing would have the same dimension.

ROBERT WILSON

Robert Wilson (born October 4, 1941) is an American experimental theater stage director and playwright who has been described by The New York Times as the world's foremost avant-garde theater artist. Over the course of his wide-ranging career, he has also worked as a choreographer, performer, painter, sculptor, video artist, and sound and lighting designer. Since the late 1960s, Robert Wilson's productions have decisively shaped the look of theater and opera. Through his signature use of light, his investigations into the structure of a simple movement, and the classical rigor of his scenic and furniture design, Wilson has continuously articulated the force and originality of his vision. Wilson's close ties and collaborations with leading artists, writers, and musicians continue to fascinate audiences worldwide. He has collaborated with Slamp, the leading Italian light design company, in 2016, presenting a collection of light sculptures entitled, “La Traviata”.

Technical Challenges

When a Research and development team begins a new creative endeavor, they face the challenge of correctly interpreting an abstract idea, of rapidly imagining it as a real object that stands as the designer’s expression as well as respects the identity of the brand. In “La Traviata’s” case, after the initial steps, we immediately focused on how to close the elements that make up its shape. 1/6

Technical Challenges

The lamp has been compared to a crystal of ice, due to its colour and structure, and Slamp, who works with patented two-dimensional techno-polymer sheets, chose Lentiflex® because of its transparency and extraordinary ability to liquify light. 2/6

Technical Challenges

The method of constructing the “arrows” was studied in parallel to the lighting technique, as it was necessary to find a way to perfectly seal their edges; the method of illumination was carefully studied to ensure that each crystal had the colour saturation that Wilson desired. 3/6

Technical Challenges

With the atmosphere of constant dialogue and constructive comparisons, the light and shapes were concrete after four months of work. Having found that no existing LEDs were fit for “La Traviata”, we decided to start from scratch. 4/6

Technical Challenges

To be sure that the main arrow and its varying elements were connected without compromising the weight or transparency of the lamp, we engineered printed injection connectors that are completely invisible. 5/6

Technical Challenges

If we said that these various studies and applications came easily or fluidly, we would be lying, but the immense respect for another’s idea, for daily interaction, and a pride that unites a team outside of a professional environment, all made the creative process a fabulous journey travelled with a smile across our faces and our eyes filled with passion. 6/6

La Traviata
by ROBERT WILSON